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Lavender
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Lavandula angustifolia

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Lamiaceae

COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

Bulgaria, France, Italy, India

PLANT PART

Flowering tops and stalks

NOTE

Middle-top

EXTRACTION METHOD

Steam Distilled

AROMA

Sweet, hearbaceous, floral, refreshing aroma with a balsamic-woody undertone

GC/MS REPORT

Esters and Monoterpenols: Linalyl acetate (28%); Linalool (29%)

NOTES ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS

Linalyl acetate's known therapeutic properties include: analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, sedative, antibacterial, antifungal, and immunostimulant; Linalool's known therapeutic properties include: antimicrobial, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antianxiety, sedative, immunostimulant, and cognition enhancement

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Skin healing - helps with relieving inflammation associated with burns, acne, dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis, boils, wounds, insect bites, itching; prevents infections. Nervous system - helps relieve stress, tension headaches, emotional anxiety, irritability, insomnia, mental distraction, and depression. Musculoskeletal system - helps relieve muscolar aches and pains, arthritis, rheumatism, PMS and menstrual cramps.

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Cooling; relieves anxiety, restlessness, palpitations, depression; promotes mental and emotional balance; uplifting and calming fears; helps achieve deeper states of meditation and awareness.

ADMINISTRATION METHOD

Bath, topical application (diluted), and inhalation

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PARTICLES

Lavander is an evergreen small shrub with linear or lance-shaped leaves original to the Mediterranean region. With approximately 30 species around the world, "Lavandula" comes from lavare which means "to wash" in Latin. Dioscorides, Greek military phisician (40-90AD) first mentioned the plant's healing qualities, advising using it as a tea with laxative and invigorating properties. Galen, Imperial Roman phisician (130-200AD), included lavender as antidote for poisons and bites. In the Middle Ages, decoctions of lavender were recommended for pulmonary congestion, dizziness, and headaches. A bath steeped in lavender was also recommended to promote rest and sleep.

SAFETY

Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing; no contraindications known

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

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