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Lemongrass
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Cymbopogon citratus

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Poaceae (Gramineae)

COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

Nepal, South Africa, Guatemala, Madagascar, Brazil, Malaysia, Vietnam

PLANT PART

Grass

NOTE

Top-Middle

EXTRACTION METHOD

Steam Distilled

AROMA

Strong, fresh, grassy and citrus odour

GC/MS REPORT

Aldehydes: Geranial (43%); Neral (33%)

NOTES ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS

Geranial and Neral (called Citral)'s known therapeutic properties include: airborne antimicrobial, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, sedative, and itching relief.

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Skin care - astringent, it is recommended as a skin tonic and to alleviate allergic and inflammatory skin problems but in low concentration; suggested for fungal infections, cold sores and shingles. Musculoskeletal system - recommended for sports injuries such as sprains, bruises, and dislocations. Digestive system - recommended for colitis, indigestion, and gastroenteritis.

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Promotes emotional and mental renewal; helps overcome negative feelings, regrets, mental fatigue, poor concentration, confusion; overall uplifting and energizing.

ADMINISTRATION METHOD

Topical application (diluted), and inhalation

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PARTICLES

The scientific name Cymbopogon derives from the Greek words "kymbe" (boat) and "pogon" (beard), referring to the flower spike arrangement. C citratus is also known as West indian Lemongrass - native to Sri Lanka - and is now grown all over the world. In Asia, it was originally used as food flavouring; in India, the crushed leaves were used as hair wash and toilet water. In Ayurveda, the herb was used to treat infectious deseases, fever, and as a sedative and insecticide. In traditional Chinese medicine, lemongrass was used for colds, headaches, stomach ache, rheumatic and abdominal pain. Lemongras tea was used for sore throats, sleep aid, and diuretic. The dried leaves are an excellent "lemony" flavour addition to herbal teas. It is often used as a masking fragrance for soaps, insecticides, and detergents. The leaves are also used as a source of cellulose and paper production.

SAFETY

Non-toxic; can be irritant and sensitizing if used at a dilution rate higher than 0.7%

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

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