top of page
Patchouli
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Pogostemon cablin

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Lamiaceae

COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

Indonesia, China, Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia

PLANT PART

Leaves

NOTE

Base

EXTRACTION METHOD

Steam Distilled

AROMA

Sweet, herbaceous, spicy, woody and earthy

GC/MS REPORT

Sesquiterpenes and Sesquiterpenols: α-bulnesene (14%); α-guaiene (13%); patchoulol (34%)

NOTES ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS

Sesquiterpenes are generally anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, and skin healing Patchoulol main therapeutic properties include: antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, immunostimulant, sedative, and skin penetration enhancer.

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Nervous system - alleviates depression and anxiety; immune support. Musculoskeletal system - helps relieve muscolar aches, spasms, and pains. Skin care - regenerating, cooling, and disinfecting; helps healing dermititis, acne, eczema, dandruff.

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Calms overthinking, worry, and mental distraction; promotes inner peace, self-awareness, meditation.

ADMINISTRATION METHOD

Bath, topical application (diluted), and inhalation

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PARTICLES

Patchouli is a perennial shrub with big green leaves and small flowers (white and pink). The common name probably derives from the Tamil word "piccilai" and the species from the Philippino word "cablin." Pogostemon cablin is the primary source of Patchouli oil of the highest quality. It is native to tropical regions of Asia - Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, China, India, Mauritius, some Carribean countries, and West Africa. The oil is widely used in Asia for incense, perfume, and insect repellent; the Arabs used it to purfume carpets, the Indians textiles, and the Chinese ink for scrolls. Patchouli arrived in the West thanks to trade with the East - carpets, clothes, and textiles were transported with patchouli leaves crashed in between them to fend off insects and moths. In the 1960s, it became the favorite scent of hippies and was used to mask marijuana's smell. From a medicinal point of view, traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Greek systems used the herb for its regenerating, cooling, disinfecting, and moisteurizing properties for the skin. The Chinese also used it to treat inflammatory conditions while the Japanese used it as a digestive tonic.

SAFETY

Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing; no contraindications known

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

bottom of page