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Tea Tree
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Melaleuca alternifoila

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Myrtaceae

COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

Australia and South Africa

PLANT PART

Leaves

NOTE

Top-Middle

EXTRACTION METHOD

Steam Distilled

AROMA

Warm, spicy, sharp aromatic scent reminiscent of Cardamom, Nutmeg, and Sweet Marjoram

GC/MS REPORT

Monoterpenols and Monoterpenes: terpinen-4-ol (37%); γ-terpinene (19%)

NOTES ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS

terpinen-4-ol's known therapeutic properties include: antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, white blood cell activation, antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, cns depressant, hypotensive, and immunostimulant γ-terpinene's known therapeutic properties include: antinociceptive, antioxidant, antispasmodic, and antiviral.

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Respiratory system - helps relieve colds, catarrh, asthma, bronchitis, coughs, sinusitis and whooping cough. Skin care - recommended for treating acne, athlete's foot, blisters, burns, cold sores, insect bites, dundruff, warts, rashes, wounds, and oily skin. Immune system - stimulates production of white blood cells to fight off infections, including oral care to prevent gum desease. Genitourinary system - recommended for treating vaginitis, cystitis, and pruritis.

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Helps with chronic mental and physical fatigue as well as minor depression; uplifting for the spirit, building up self-confidence.

ADMINISTRATION METHOD

Bath, topical application (diluted), and inhalation

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PARTICLES

Tea tree is a shrub or small tree that pefers warm, smapy areas, drainage lines, and riverbanks. The name Melaleuca derives from the Greek words melos (dark, black) and leukon (white), apparently referring to the first species that had white papery bark on the higher branches (that could be easily peeled off in broad strips from larger trees) and a black lower trunk. The Australian Aborigines used the leaves by simply crushing them in their hands and inhale the oil to relieve colds and headaches. The common name Tea Tree was first used by Captain Cook in 1777 as the leaves were steeped in water to make tea to prevent scurvy. The oil was first distilled in 1920 n Australia and its medicinal properties as germicide and antinfectious agent were documented in the 1930s. Tea tree is also used in soaps, toothpaste, deodorants, and mouth wash but has limited use in perfumery.

SAFETY

Non-toxic and non-irritant but possibly sensitizing for people with sensiitive skin, especially if using oxidized oil.

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

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