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Vetiver
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Vetiveria zizanoides

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Poaceae (Gramineae)

COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

Java, Comoro, Reunion

PLANT PART

Roots

NOTE

Base

EXTRACTION METHOD

Steam Distilled

AROMA

Sweet, woody, nutty and balsamic with musty notes.

GC/MS REPORT

Sesquiterpenols: Sesquiterpenol (17%); Khusimol (11%)

NOTES ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS

Sesquiterpenols are known for their anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant, and sedative properties

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Reproductive system - regulates oestrogen and progesternone levels so it is ideal for toning down menopause effects, including hot flushes; it is also recommended for PMS symptoms. Musculoskeletal system - helps relieve muscolar aches and pains, rheumatism, and arthritis. Skin care - effective in treating weak, loose, fatigue skin; restorative Nervous system - beneficial for anxiety, stress, insomnia, and depression; beneficialfor total exhaustion - mental, physical, and emotional. Overall tonic and restorative.

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Helps dispel worry, obsessions, compulsions, inability to let go, feelings of insecurity and vulnerability; depression and anxiety.

ADMINISTRATION METHOD

Bath, topical application (diluted), and inhalation

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PARTICLES

A tall perennial grass that is native to northern India. In addition to the oil, the roots contain fructose, glucose, sucrose, and free glycerol - mature roots have the highest essential oil concentration. Vetiver was transported around the world more than a century ago and its main use was to prevent soil erosion as its long rootlets would hold the soil on mountainous slopes during the wet season. It was introduced to Reunion Islands in the mid-1950s, which now produce the finest quality oil (Bourbon vetiver). Vetiever is also grown commercially for oil in Java, Seychelles, Brazil, Haiti, and Japan. In traditional medicine, the fresh roots were used to make a stimulant, tonic drink. In Ayurveda, it is used to allevaite thirst, heatstroke, headaches, and fever. The oil is also used to relieve rheumatoid arthirtis and overall join inflammation. A decoction of the roots is recommended to break down kidney stones. There are many other non-medicinal uses because the long, strong, fibrous roots help with soil erosion control, water filtration, animal feed (young leaves only), biofuel, and organic pest control.

SAFETY

Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitising

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

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