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Rosemary ct. Camphor oil
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Rosmarinus officinalis ct camphor

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Lamiaceae

COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN

Spain, France, and Tunisia

PLANT PART

Leaves and twigs

NOTE

Top-Middle

EXTRACTION METHOD

Steam Distilled

AROMA

Strong, fresh, herbaceous, woody, and balsamic

GC/MS REPORT

Ketones, Oxides, and Monoterpenes: 1,8 cineole (19%); camphor (19%); α-pinene (23%); camphene (11%)

NOTES ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS

1,8 cineole's known therapeutic properties include: analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, mucolytic, immunostimulant, skin penetration enhancer, and cognition enhancement; Camphor's known therapeutic properties include: antifungal, antibacterial, analgesic, antitussive, mucolytic, and stimulant. α-pinene 's known therapeutic properties include: analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antinociceptive, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anxiolytic, and gastroprotective. Camphene's known therapeutic properties include: anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antinociceptive, and mucolytic.

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Skin healing - helps with relieving inflammation associated with acne; stimulates hair growth, prevents dundruff. Respiratory system - expectorant and mucolytic, helps relieving chest, sinus, and throat infections, including bronchitis, sinusitis, and asthma. Musculoskeletal system - helps treat arthritis, rheumatism, stiff, tired, and overworked muscles. Cardiovascular system - tonic of the heart; it is said to benefit cardiac fatigue, palpitations, low blood pressure, circulatory issues at the extremities. Digestive system - helps treat gastroenteritis, colitis, flatulence.

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Promotes motivation and self-confidence; stimulates mentl focus and energy; counteracts feelings of apathy, pessimism, fatigue.

ADMINISTRATION METHOD

Bath, topical application (diluted), and inhalation

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PARTICLES

Rosemary is a small evergreen shrub native to the Mediterranean region. The majrity of essential oil production, though, happens in Spain, France, and Tunisia. There are primarily three chemotypes of R. officinalis: 1,8 cineole (Tunisia), camphor (Spain), and verbenone (France). The higher the altitute of cultivation, the higher the camphor content (up to 20%); rosemary grown at sea level has little to no camphor instead. The name Rosemary derives from two Latin words: Ros (dew) and Marinus (sea), referrign to a plant that grows near the coast. It has a long history of being used as an aromatic and medicinal herb. The Egyptians loved it and placed it in tombs, starting with the first dynasty. The Greeks and Romans considered it a sacred plant, symbolizing love and death. Greek philosopher Theophrastus and Greek physician Dioscorides recommended using it for stomach and liver problems; Greek physician Hippocrates recommended cooking rosmary with vegetables to overcome liver and spleen disorders, while in the Roman Empire, physician Galen prescribed it for jaundice. The ancients also used to burn it as incense during religious ceremonies or with juniper berries to prevent infections and pury the air. In traditional medicine, Rosemary was regarded as a carminative and considered very effective against headaches and an overall tonic. Today, the oil is used extensively as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, perufumes, and detergents.

SAFETY

Non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing; contraindicated during pregnancy and with epilepsy

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

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