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Thyme
SCIENTIFIC NAME

Thymus vulgaris

BIOTANICAL FAMILY

Lamiaceae, mint family

PLANT PART

Leaves harvested before they flowers, fresh or dried

PREPARATIONS

Tea, tincture, and food

THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

Astringent, antiseptic, antiviral, antibacterial, antispasmodic

EMOTIONAL/ENERGETIC QUALITIES

Uplifting and encouraging

ETNOBOTANY LORE AND ANCIENT PRACTICES

Some say the etymology of the word thyme is the Greek word "thymon" (to fumigate) or "thumus" (courage) as the plant was associated with bravery. Roman philosopher and naturalist Pliny the Elder stated that burning thyme would help repel venomous creatures. The Greeks believed thyme was a symbol of elegance and chivalry. Roman soldiers bathed in water infused with the herb before going into battle and in the Middle Ages thyme was sewn into knights' scarves before leaving for the Crusades. St. Hildegarde recommended thyme for leprosy, plague, paralysis, and lice, while in England kings used it to protect themselves from disease when in public. In the 17th century, thyme was recommended to expel phlegm, treat whooping cough, and help falling asleep. Folk medicine also suggested the herb for gastrointestinal issues and minor wounds. The herb is most useful for treating upper respiratory infection, bronchitis, and cough. Of course, thyme is widely used as a culinary herb.

SAFETY

Tea and tincture are safe for general use

DISCLAIMER: The information provided above is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease; these statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult a licensed healthcare specialist for specific medical advice.

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